Technical Updates – British Insurance Brokers' Association https://www.biba.org.uk The British Insurance Brokers' Association is the UK's leading general insurance intermediary organisation Thu, 06 Dec 2018 15:07:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 154303522 Re-fit of the Motor Insurance Directive – mid November 2018 briefing note https://www.biba.org.uk/latest-news/refit-of-the-mid-november-2018-briefing-note/ Thu, 22 Nov 2018 14:53:08 +0000 https://www.biba.org.uk/?p=31259 We support the helpful amendments proposed by Rapporteur Dita Charanzova in her draft report regarding ‘scope’.  The insertion of the amendments around ‘type approval’, ‘motorsport

The post Re-fit of the Motor Insurance Directive – mid November 2018 briefing note appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
We support the helpful amendments proposed by Rapporteur Dita Charanzova in her draft report regarding ‘scope’.  The insertion of the amendments around ‘type approval’, ‘motorsport exclusion’, ‘use of a vehicle in traffic’ are sensible amendments that are very welcome.

Amendment 3

We very much agree with the amendment in stating that it would be disproportionate to impose any expensive and excessive requirement to cover the smaller vehicles. Therefore the proposal to allow member states to decide at national level the appropriate level of protection of parties potentially injured by vehicles other than those subject to EU type-approval is most welcome. This would ensure that vulnerable customers like those with disability vehicles/ mobility scooters would not incur the increased cost of compulsory motor insurance/ stand the risk of uninsured driving or risk having to give up use of the vehicle if they could not afford the insurance. It would also be an impossible burden of enforcement for non-type approval vehicles (like ride-on lawnmowers).

Amendment 4

We completely agree with the amendment that it is appropriate to exclude motorsport from the scope of the directive when being solely used for competition. No insurers are willing to provide a compliant motor third party liability policy for competitor to competitor motorsport, therefore this amendment prevents significant harm to the motorsport sector, that would be unable to comply with the requirements of the original text.  We would urge consistency in the terms used and would agree that  ‘controlled track or space’ is the most appropriate term as per the amendment, as opposed to amendment 14 which states ‘within a closed area’.

Amendment 5 and 13

This Amendment is the most important of all in the ‘REFIT’. We agree with the text stating ‘use of  a vehicle’ means any use of such vehicle in traffic that is, at the time of the accident, consistent with the vehicles function as a means of transport etc. This ensures proportionality and the avoidance of many small non-type approval vehicles that are not designed for use in traffic.  The original text would have created many unintended consequences for customers having to insure non type-approval vehicles (due to affordability reasons, the need for registration of non-type approval vehicles).

Amendment 15

We simply wanted to clarify that a vehicle (e.g. agricultural) purely used on closed private land would not require compulsory motor insurance cover, whereas a similar vehicle that is occasionally used on a road or where the public have access would need full motor cover at all times, even when used on private land. Under the first scenario where the vehicle is never used on a public road or a place where the public has access, we would feel it appropriate that the employer liability/public liability insurance pay for injury to employees and the public (while on the private land).

Amendment 43

While we recognise that price comparison sites can assist the customer in seeking out the cheapest insurance policy, we have experienced many negative issues for customers in some EU markets. On the basis that they are prevalent in most countries and regulated for insurance intermediary activity under the IDD, we believe that a compulsory requirement for comparison tool is neither necessary nor appropriate to be introduce in MID. An independent regulated insurance intermediary would be able to assist the client with accessing a complex product and seeking out a competitive price.

We are also concerned that the text refers to them as ‘price’ comparison sites. A comparison tool is considered a useful tool, but it should also allow for comparison of the coverage (policy terms, exclusions, level of services, etc.) that is provided by each insurance product in order to give a complete overview of the products available. A comparison tool focused on prices does not allow for a comparison of relevant, clear and meaningful information (arising from the actual policy wording), distracting thereby consumers and precluding them from taking an informed decision about their insurance products.

Amendment 9 and 42

We welcome the equality of treatment of claims history statements across differing member states. We simply want to express caution in the detail of how these might be required to operate. We were wondering whether any prescriptive requirement for uniformity (like an Insurance Product Information Document (IPID)) will create an administrative burden, significant IT system changes and add cost into the system. Therefore we are concerned with the use of the text ‘content and form’ in amendment 42 as differing EU states have differing systems of recognising safer driving, some using no claim discount, some using bonus malus. Therefore rather than a fixed IPID style system we would recommend simply that the term ‘information’ is used instead of the term ‘content and form’. The most important factor in recognising the number of claims free driving is the number of years and this would be the most helpful information.

One further point to add is that the MID can only determine a format for claims that occur under compulsory motor insurance born of the directive (i.e. Third Party, Personal Injury and Third Party Property Damage).  It cannot require an insurer to report on AD/Fire/Theft or Windscreen claims so may prove a challenge in some EU markets where these types of claims are taken into consideration too.

Amendment 2 and 39

MID requires compulsory motor insurance to apply to trailers. In relation to this provision, we see a potential issue arising due to Brexit as there is a chance that trailers may need to be issued with separate green cards.

Currently the UK RTA does not match this requirement. A summary of the UK insurance position is –

  • Attached trailer – trailer covered under the motor insurance policy of the towing vehicle (an extension to UK Private Car, Commercial Vehicle and Fleet policies) irrespective if vehicle in the UK or driving in the EU.
  • Detached Trailer in the UK – no compulsory insurance requirement under the RTA.  Some Fleet and CV policies allow an extension for detached trailers – in effect a Public Liability cover (usually with a limit).
  • Detached trailer in the EU – the MIB would pick up any such claims if a UK motor policy weren’t to respond.

The UK has ratified the 1968 Vienna Convention in relation to trailers by the recently passed the ‘Haulage Permits and Trailer Registration Act 2018’ (see- http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2018/19/contents/enacted) which means that trailers used in EEA countries need to be registered and carry a separate registration plate if over 750kg.

The post Re-fit of the Motor Insurance Directive – mid November 2018 briefing note appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
31259
Green Cards post EU Exit https://www.biba.org.uk/latest-news/green-cards-post-eu-exit/ Thu, 04 Oct 2018 11:01:46 +0000 https://www.biba.org.uk/?p=30954 In line with many other HM Government departments the Department for Transport (DfT) are planning for the possibility of a ‘no deal’ ‘hard’ Brexit and

The post Green Cards post EU Exit appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
In line with many other HM Government departments the Department for Transport (DfT) are planning for the possibility of a ‘no deal’ ‘hard’ Brexit and have called on the insurance industry to make preparations to assist UK motorists and companies using their vehicles in Europe after 29 March 2019.

They have issued a technical bulletin ‘Vehicle insurance if there’s no Brexit deal’, please see – https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/vehicle-insurance-if-theres-no-brexit-deal/vehicle-insurance-if-theres-no-brexit-deal

Post EU Exit UK motor insurers will continue to be required to provide third party motor insurance for motorists driving in EU countries.  Currently, as an EU member, UK motorists are not required to carry a Green Card to evidence this cover, but in the event of a ‘no deal’ ‘hard’ Brexit, this position may change and UK motorists may be required to carry a Green Card, as proof of third party motor insurance, whilst driving in EEA countries, plus Andorra, Serbia and Switzerland.

The UK will remain part of the Council of Bureaux (CoB) , following commitments by the UK government, and will remain within the Motor Insurance ‘Free Circulation Zone’, but this is subject to formal approval by the European Commission (EC).  We understand that the EC advise that the approval will not be given separately to the overall negotiations for the UK’s exit from the European Union and is subject to the EC’s ratification of any deal eventually agreed.

BIBA understands that, as part of CoB procedures, the UK Motor Insurers’ Bureau (MIB) may have to negotiate bilateral agreements with each of the MIB equivalents in the 30 countries in the EEA. These agreements ensure that all EEA countries will recognise Green Cards issued for UK motorists travelling abroad and the same will be true for foreign motorists entering the UK.

BIBA’s key message to members is to engage with your motor insurer partners to understand what preparatory steps they are making in order to be able to provide Green Cards to your customers driving in the EU post 29 March 2019.

Our understanding is that the format and pantone of a Green Card is set out in Council of Bureaux (CoB) rules and that a paper copy must be provided   This means that delivery of a Green Card via a Software House is unlikely to be a solution.   Currently it is not possible for a Green Card to be made available electronically to customers, for an example via an App.

In respect of business vehicles towing a trailer travelling on the continent, BIBA understands that some EEA countries (and other CoB members) may require a separate Green Card to be issued for a trailer, rather than the towing vehicle and trailer being shown on one Green Card.  The UK Government has recently enacted the Haulage Permits and Trailer Registration Act 2018 (see – http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2018/19/enacted ), partly to enable UK trailers being used abroad to be registered.

CoB rules require a Green Card to be made available free of charge, but do allow administration costs incurred for the production and supply of a Green Card.

BIBA urges members to –

  • Engage with your motor insurer panel to understand their intended procedures for issuing Green Cards.
  • Engage with your customers, particularly to understand as part of your customers’ ‘demands and needs’ if they will be traveling abroad in their vehicle and alert them to the possibility that the may require a Green Card post 29 March 2019.

 

The post Green Cards post EU Exit appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
30954
Cyber Security Awareness Month https://www.biba.org.uk/latest-news/cyber-security-awareness-month/ Thu, 04 Oct 2018 10:36:58 +0000 https://www.biba.org.uk/?p=30947 BIBA is helping Business in the Community inform SME’s about cyber attacks.  SME’s can find information and sense check resilience by completing a 5 minute

The post Cyber Security Awareness Month appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
BIBA is helping Business in the Community inform SME’s about cyber attacks.  SME’s can find information and sense check resilience by completing a 5 minute survey, which references insurance. Members can help by directing SME clients to the survey link or taking the survey themselves.

Take Survey here

Click here for Business in the Community Cyber and Flood Resilience Guide

The post Cyber Security Awareness Month appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
30947
Primera Air ceases operations https://www.biba.org.uk/latest-news/primera-air-ceases-operations/ Thu, 04 Oct 2018 08:46:16 +0000 https://www.biba.org.uk/?p=30945 Travel insurance is a vital part of any planned holiday and the importance of suitable cover is highlighted by major events such as these. Travel

The post Primera Air ceases operations appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
Travel insurance is a vital part of any planned holiday and the importance of suitable cover is highlighted by major events such as these.

Travel insurance is designed to protect travellers against a variety of different risks including cancellation, medical emergency or illness and supplier failure.  However, consumers need to check the cover they buy carefully because not all polices include cover against airline failure.

With the news that Primera Air has ceased operations,  the UK Civil Aviation Authority has already confirmed that Primera Air is not covered by the  CAA ATOL Protection scheme, which only covers passengers booked on a package holiday.

The CAA has advised that those passengers who have already travelled will need to make their own arrangements to return home and to contact their travel agent/tour operator or travel insurer.

Anyone booked to travel on a Primera flight is advised to consult the CAA website https://www.caa.co.uk/News/Advice-to-UK-consumers-on-Primera-Air-ceasing-operations/ which has comprehensive advice on what to do next and how to claim a refund.

The CAA advises that customers whose booking was made by credit card may be protected by Section 75 of the Consumer Credit Act 1974 and are advised to check with their card issuer. Similar cover may apply for customers who used a Visa debit card to make the booking and they should check with their bank

Those customers who find themselves not eligible for compensation should contact their insurance broker or travel insurance company to check if airline failure is covered.

The BIBA accredited travel scheme through DTW1991 does include cover for airline failure. Find a BIBA broker at www.biba.org.uk/find-insurance  . The DTW1991 claims line can be contacted on Tel: 01623 683 585 or email claims@ias-health.com.

The post Primera Air ceases operations appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
30945
Intruder Alarms – Updated Guidance for members https://www.biba.org.uk/latest-news/intruder-alarms-updated-guidance-for-members/ Mon, 06 Aug 2018 11:08:12 +0000 https://www.biba.org.uk/?p=30652 The post Intruder Alarms – Updated Guidance for members appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
The post Intruder Alarms – Updated Guidance for members appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
30652
BIBA TOBA Template https://www.biba.org.uk/technical-updates/business-practice/biba-toba-template/ Tue, 17 Jul 2018 08:33:24 +0000 https://www.biba.org.uk/?p=30459 The post BIBA TOBA Template appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
The post BIBA TOBA Template appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
30459
BIBA helps to reduce costs for brokers through a new voluntary TOBA template https://www.biba.org.uk/technical-updates/biba-helps-to-reduce-costs-for-brokers-though-a-new-voluntary-toba-template/ Tue, 17 Jul 2018 07:45:12 +0000 https://www.biba.org.uk/?p=30544 In response to member calls for help in reducing the administrative burden placed upon them by having to check many similar but not quite the

The post BIBA helps to reduce costs for brokers through a new voluntary TOBA template appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
In response to member calls for help in reducing the administrative burden placed upon them by having to check many similar but not quite the same insurer Terms of Business Agreements, we have now produced a voluntary TOBA template that is well balanced for both brokers and insurers alike. 

In creating the TOBA template we worked with many industry stakeholders and sought expert legal input too. We believe that promoting widespread acceptance of the new template will revolutionise the process of formal TOBAs in the general insurance marketplace. 

What we have produced is a standardisation of the common clauses that appear in all TOBAs and which make up more than 70% of the usual content. Using this standardisation the TOBA template will provide a base platform for the broker-insurer relationship which can be amended, added to or reduced if required by brokers or insurers to take into account trading relationships.

This will reduce workloads and increase accuracy, ultimately reducing costs in your business.  The roll-out has begun with a launch in the trade press and the BIBA team will now continue to work with insurers to encourage take up of the template as and when each of them is ready to   re-issue their agreements.

Read our press release here

View the TOBA template here

If you have any questions or you want to know more about the TOBA development please do not hesitate to contact me.

Kind regards

Mike Hallam
Head of Technical Services

The post BIBA helps to reduce costs for brokers through a new voluntary TOBA template appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
30544
GAP Fleet Claims https://www.biba.org.uk/technical-updates/gap-fleet-claims/ Thu, 14 Jun 2018 08:59:27 +0000 https://www.biba.org.uk/?p=30091 GAP Insurance. Top up fleet claims, read some examples form GAP scheme provider Jackson Lee.

The post GAP Fleet Claims appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
GAP Insurance. Top up fleet claims, read some examples form GAP scheme provider Jackson Lee.

The post GAP Fleet Claims appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
30091
BIBA Response to the EC’s Motor Insurance Directive REFIT evaluation https://www.biba.org.uk/press-releases/biba-reponse-motor-insurance-directive-refit/ Fri, 25 May 2018 12:31:28 +0000 https://www.biba.org.uk/?p=29945 Yesterday the EC announced its proposals on changes to the Motor Insurance Directive in light of a number of court rulings that have affected its

The post BIBA Response to the EC’s Motor Insurance Directive REFIT evaluation appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
Yesterday the EC announced its proposals on changes to the Motor Insurance Directive in light of a number of court rulings that have affected its application and has identified five areas for clarification. BIBA’s views on the proposals are set out below.

  1. Insolvency of an insurer

BIBA is satisfied with the EC’s proposal in relation to compensation arrangements ultimately being the responsibility of the home member state of the insurer concerned.  The Financial Services Compensation Scheme already fulfills this function in the UK.

  1. Claims history statements

BIBA welcomes the equality of treatment of claims history statements across differing member states but expresses caution in the detail of how these might be required to operate.  BIBA believes that any prescriptive requirement for uniformity will create an administrative burden, significant IT system changes and add cost into a system which already works well in the UK.

  1. Uninsured driving.

The current Motor Insurance Directive prohibits cross-border motor insurance checks on vehicles entering a national territory. BIBA welcomes the proposal from the EC that will  allow, without interfering with free-movement,  checks on the validity of insurance especially if they are driven by technology, are  non-discriminatory, not aimed exclusively at insurance verification and do not require the vehicle to stop.

  1. Minimum amounts of cover:

BIBA supports the harmonisation proposal that there should be equal minimum levels of protection across the EU member states to ensure that there is a sufficient level of minimum protection across the EU for the innocent parties to motor vehicle accidents in relation to personal injury compensation and damage to property irrespective of the type of vehicle.

  1. Scope of the directive (VNUK)

The EC is proposing to clarify the definition of “use of a vehicle” and incorporate the judgements of the Court of Justice of the European Union in the cases of Vnuk, Rodrigues de Andrade and Torreiro. The proposal is to change the definition to “use of a vehicle means any use of such vehicle, intended normally to serve as a means of transport, that is consistent with the normal function of that vehicle, irrespective of the vehicles characteristics and irrespective of the terrain on which the motor vehicle is used and of whether it is stationary or in motion”.  While the EC has indicated that the proposal clarifies the concept of use and where compulsory insurance therefore applies BIBA still has concerns over the application of this definition which we believe still lacks clarity.

Martin Bridges, Technical Services Manager at BIBA said: “Relating the need for compulsory motor insurance to rely on operating in respect of any ‘use, intended normally as a means of transport, consistent with the normal function of the vehicle…. irrespective of the terrain…’ will potentially still bring many more vehicles into scope from mobility scooters to motorsports because of the because of the possible legal interpretation of the definition of ‘transport’.  This leaves considerable uncertainty for potentially vulnerable customers wondering if they now need to buy insurance for a disability vehicle.”

Graeme Trudgill, BIBA Executive Director said: “Following the original Vnuk ruling BIBA, the UK Government, a number of other EU states and insurance bodies put forward a solution that would have brought considerably more clarity to this situation and prevented these potential unintended consequences.  In the Commission’s roadmap document one of the key suggestions was to consider changing the definition of a vehicle to ‘one used in traffic’.  This would have resolved many of the issues, however, the EC has moved towards motor insurance being the compulsory solution for liability wherever a vehicle is used – effectively including on private land. This goes beyond current UK legislation.

Currently, under UK law, users of a vehicle such as a tractor or fork-lift truck being used on private land would simply purchase public and employer’s liability insurance to fund any liability for compensation. It is unhelpful that customers will now potentially have to buy wider cover for many more vehicles types being used in more places.

We intend to continue to express our concerns that these proposals may increase bureaucracy, cost and uncertainly for personal and commercial policyholders, resulting in potentially significant unintended consequences in areas such as motorsports and for vehicles not previously requiring motor insurance.”

Ends

BIBA view of Vnuk

https://www.biba.org.uk/press-releases/biba-comment-joint-industry-response-motor-insurance-directive-refit/

EC press release

http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-18-3731_en.htms

The post BIBA Response to the EC’s Motor Insurance Directive REFIT evaluation appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
29945
Business Interruption Declarations https://www.biba.org.uk/technical-updates/business-interruption-declarations/ Thu, 17 May 2018 08:30:44 +0000 https://www.biba.org.uk/?p=29849 The most recent (2017) survey of Declaration Linked Business Interruption insurance by the Chartered Institute of Loss Adjusters (CILA) highlighted the ongoing concerns of underinsurance

The post Business Interruption Declarations appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
The most recent (2017) survey of Declaration Linked Business Interruption insurance by the Chartered Institute of Loss Adjusters (CILA) highlighted the ongoing concerns of underinsurance in Business Interruption (BI) claims.  The latest survey, the fourth in nine years, identified that 47.5% of BI policies were arranged on a declaration linked basis and that 44% of those BI policies were under-insured and that the under-insurance shortfall on average was 44%.

Three of the top ten underlying causes identified in the CILA report were –

  • Misunderstanding the insurance definition of Gross Profit
  • Misunderstanding the basis period to be declared
  • Declarations not submitted or not requested

In an endeavour to assist brokers and clients BIBA has drawn together the attached ‘Business Interruption (Declaration Linked Basis) – Insurance Gross Profit Declaration Form’, which BIBA members may wish to use.

The form will help to address the three underlying causes highlighted above –

Misunderstanding the insurance definition of Gross Profit

This was found to be the most significant cause of underinsurance in the CILA survey.

An accountant’s definition of ‘Gross Profit’ is different to the insurance definition and this can lead to confusion when relying on an accountant to provide a figure for Gross Profit – either estimated or declared.   This topic is discussed in the excellent CILA, Insurance Institute of London and Chartered Insurance Institute publication ‘Business Interruption Policy Wordings – Challenges Highlighted by Claims Experience’, see https://www.cila.co.uk/cila/downloads/sig-downloads/business-interruptions/files-9/13-bi-policy-wordings/file

Some Insurers have adopted different terminology for Gross Profit to differentiate from the accountants’ definition – for example ‘Insurance Profit’, Insurable Profit’ or ‘Insured Profit’.

The Declaration Form refers to ‘Insurance Gross Profit’ and sets out a step-by-step guide how an accountant or auditor should calculate the declared figure from the last audited accounts.

It must be emphasised that insurers will have differing definitions of Gross Profit and it is important that the Declaration Form is amended to reflect the insurer’s definition – particularly in respect of Uninsured Working Expenses.  Also, care needs to be taken if your client’s Gross Profit calculation does include Uninsured Working Expenses additional to the BI policy Gross Profit definition (which will be shown on the policy schedule). These will need to be taken into account when the form is completed.

Misunderstanding the basis period to be declared

The declaration form should be completed in accordance with the BI policy wording.

The CILA research identified that the basis periods are as follows –

  1. The last 12 months prior to the policy period beginning – 44% of insurer BI wordings
  2. The Gross Profit anticipated in the policy period – 25% of insurer BI wordings
  3. The Statutory Accounts from financial year most nearly concurrent with the expired insurance year – 14% of insurer BI wordings
  4. The last set of Statutory Accounts ending most recently prior to the commencement of the insurance policy period – 14% of insurer BI wordings
  5. Other – 3% of insurer BI wordings

It is also important to understand that if the insured’s indemnity period is in excess of 12 months, the declaration to be supplied is only annual figures from the financial accounts, as the policy wording will usually allow for a proportionate increase.

Declarations not requested

The declaration-linked BI policy wording will include a requirement for the insured to submit a declaration, supported by accountant’s figures, and usually the policy will require the declaration to be made within a set time limit.

For example –

Insurer A – Premium Adjustment Clause

You will supply, within six months of the expiry of each Period of Insurance, a professional accountant’s declaration of Insured Profit earned in Your last financial year most closely corresponding to the Period of Insurance.

Insurer B – Declarations Condition

Not later than 6 months after the expiry of each Period of Insurance, the Insured shall provide the Insurer with a declaration confirmed by the Insured’s auditors of the Gross Profit earned during the financial year most nearly concurrent with the expired Period of Insurance.

In practice, many insurers do not pursue Gross Profit declarations and clients may not be aware of their obligations under the policy.  The benefit of declaration-linked BI cover to clients is that the sum insured is increased (typically by 133%) and the average clause is deleted.

With the Insurance Act 2015 creating new duties of disclosures on commercial clients it may be argued that failure to supply a declaration may result in a proportionate remedy being applied at the time of a claim, reducing a claim payment to the client.

It should be stressed that some insurers do provide their own declaration form, unique to their Gross Profit definition, and these should be used whenever possible.  They may be supplied by the insurer with renewal documents or be available on the insurer broker extranet sites.

BIBA would encourage brokers to inform their clients of their duty under the policy to provide a declaration and to supply the insurer declaration form – or if that is not available the BIBA declaration form – and ensure that it is completed and returned to insurers.

BIBA will be issuing further guidance on setting the Estimated Gross Profit sum insured for declaration-linked BI cover and also the setting of indemnity periods.

The post Business Interruption Declarations appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
29849
Pool Re Updates its Proposition https://www.biba.org.uk/technical-updates/pool-re-updates-proposition/ Wed, 28 Mar 2018 13:47:28 +0000 https://www.biba.org.uk/?p=29436 Since Pool Re was formed 25 years ago, there has been enormous change not only in the terrorism threat landscape, but also within the insurance

The post Pool Re Updates its Proposition appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
Since Pool Re was formed 25 years ago, there has been enormous change not only in the terrorism threat landscape, but also within the insurance market that is reinsured by the Pool Re scheme. Insurance products are very different, more commoditised and sold through a more diverse range of channels. Moreover, there are fewer commercial insurance companies than 25 years ago, primarily due to merger and acquisition, but the insurers are now larger or global entities with very different risk appetites.

Importantly the threat of terrorism is very different today that it was in the 1990’s. The IRA threat to mainland GB at that time was less complicated than the less discriminate and more diffuse threat today. Modern terrorists seem less predictable and are able to adapt their tactics and attack methodology very quickly. The advent of social media and the internet means that a disparate organisation such as DAESH can radicalise and then inspire its followers remotely to do harm to people and property across the world. This means that the very linear threat posed to Great Britain by the IRA, which was focused primarily on explosive devices, has shifted to a threat that can manifest itself through knives, guns, vehicles, planes, explosives or perhaps in future causing damage or harm by remote digital (cyber) means.

Terrorist groups have shown a high level of IT skill and innovation in embracing social media, and it became evident in 2016 that these skills may be deployed in a more direct way to trigger damage or destruction of property. We commissioned a research report from the Centre for Risk Studies at Cambridge Judge Business School (available on the Pool Re website) which highlighted terrorists as having the intent to use such means, but having yet to find the capability, although this was likely to change in the future. In light of this research Pool Re concluded that we should extend our coverage to cover damage caused by the use of remote digital means such as hacking or virus. The extension was approved by HM Treasury in September 2017 and took effect on 1st April 2018.

At its inception Pool Re provided a very narrow cover restricted to fire and explosion, which moved to ‘All-Risks’ including CBRN (chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear) in 2003. From 1st April 2018 the cover now includes damage caused by terrorists using remote digital means (cyber). This wider cover, provided as standard to any policyholder buying terrorism cover from a Pool Re Member, is now the widest coverage for terrorism damage available anywhere in the world, and ensures that the scheme is able to provide protection against damage caused by today’s terrorist. Crucially there is no financial limitation on the amount of terrorism cover, beyond the sum insured, that Pool Re member insurers can provide by virtue of the unlimited nature of the reinsurance agreement with Pool Re. We have also launched a number of other important changes to the Scheme from April 2018, and our Member Insurers will now be making these available to their policyholders.

One of the key changes we have made is to the way in which the Scheme deals with SME policyholders. We recognise that SME products have changed enormously in the past decade, both in terms of how they are structured and priced. Invariably now policies are packages with rating applied to a narrow set of values, usually material damage. Business Interruption is usually provided to a standard limit and is a non-underwritten coverage, so the consequence of Pool Re continuing to apply a rate to this limit was that our approach was out of step, and the reinsurance premiums incompatible with the underlying policy. Accordingly this has now been amended so that Pool Re reinsurance premiums for SME policies will be calculated solely on the material damage sums insured. This should make terrorism premiums significantly more competitive, especially outside of major urban areas, where a typical SME reinsurance premium could now be as little as £20.

We have also designed some initiatives that will appeal to mid-corporate clients, most notably the Vulnerability Self-Assessment Tool, a risk mitigation platform developed in partnership with counter-terrorism professionals and recently accredited as ‘Secure by Design’ (the police security assurance standard). Policyholders with more than £50m of insured assets can complete the question sets within the tool, receive mitigation advice and qualify for a 5% discount if they attain a certain standard.

The other changes include increased discounts for deductibles over £250,000 and wider availability of loss limit discounts. Furthermore the new rules recognise for the first time flexible limit coverages on BI, and allow discounts where these fall within certain criteria.

Finally, Pool Re has been working with Government to explore how the scheme could be extended to cover non-damage business interruption. The events in Europe in 2015/16 and then in the UK in 2017, highlighted the terrorism insurance gap and the restrictions imposed by the 1993 Act, which restricts our coverage to damage. In March 2018 Government advised it would be amending the 1993 Act to allow Pool Re to offer cover for non-damage terrorism and once the extended proposition has been built, which is anticipated to be towards the end of 2018, the Pool Re scheme will be able to offer coverage that truly recognises the modern nature of the terrorist threat.

S Coates
Chief Underwriting Officer
Pool Re

The post Pool Re Updates its Proposition appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
29436
Important information about CBL Insurance Europe https://www.biba.org.uk/technical-updates/important-information-cbl-insurance-europe/ Wed, 14 Mar 2018 11:09:43 +0000 https://www.biba.org.uk/?p=29338 The Central Bank of Ireland has informed the Financial Conduct Authority that it has made an application to the High Court to have a provisional

The post Important information about CBL Insurance Europe appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
The Central Bank of Ireland has informed the Financial Conduct Authority that it has made an application to the High Court to have a provisional administrator – Kieran Wallace of KPMG – appointed to CBL Insurance Europe dac (CBLIE) which underwrites construction related credit and financial surety insurance, professional indemnity insurance, property insurance, and travel bonding.

The Central Bank issued a direction to CBLIE instructing it to cease writing all business with immediate effect from 19 February 2018, until further notice. Under the terms of this direction, CBLIE cannot renew existing policies, which includes policies that renew automatically

Existing policies continue to remain in force however the Central Bank is recommending that policyholders contact CBLIE directly. Members that are using an MGA that has taken capacity from CBLIE may want to consider contacting the MGA to find out about their plans for replacing the capacity provider and on the continuing validity of existing contracts.

Brokers that have placed business with CBLIE directly need to consider whether it would be appropriate to contact affected clients, apprise them of the situation and seek instructions on whether the client would like their business moved (explaining the consequences of doing so).

The post Important information about CBL Insurance Europe appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
29338
An update from CNA Hardy, BIBA’s Excess of Loss scheme provider a year on since the change in the Ogden/discount rate https://www.biba.org.uk/technical-updates/update-cna-hardy-bibas-excess-loss-scheme-provider-year-since-change-ogden-discount-rate/ Wed, 14 Mar 2018 09:06:41 +0000 https://www.biba.org.uk/?p=29334 The post An update from CNA Hardy, BIBA’s Excess of Loss scheme provider a year on since the change in the Ogden/discount rate appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
The post An update from CNA Hardy, BIBA’s Excess of Loss scheme provider a year on since the change in the Ogden/discount rate appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
29334
Temporary Vehicles on Unspecified Motor Fleet and Motor Trade Policies and the Motor Insurance Database (MID) https://www.biba.org.uk/technical-updates/temporary-vehicles-unspecified-motor-fleet-motor-trade-policies-motor-insurance-database-mid/ Mon, 05 Mar 2018 12:58:50 +0000 https://www.biba.org.uk/?p=29250 In response to a query from a member we have put together the following guidance on temporary vehicles under unspecified motor trade and motor fleet

The post Temporary Vehicles on Unspecified Motor Fleet and Motor Trade Policies and the Motor Insurance Database (MID) appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
In response to a query from a member we have put together the following guidance on temporary vehicles under unspecified motor trade and motor fleet policies and the MID –

The Motor Insurance Bureau (MIB) advice in respect of recording temporary vehicles for Motor Trade policies is –

‘The MIB recommendation is that all vehicle records that have road cover included are sent to the MID regardless of the period of cover in order to minimise the risk of being stopped by the police and possible vehicle seizure.

Untaxed stock vehicles (i.e. driven on trade plates) need not be notified, although if it is easier simply to notify every vehicle, this is acceptable – in fact this is the MIB’s preferred approach’.  

and in respect of Motor Fleet is –

‘All vehicles insured on your fleet policy should be added to the MID, unless they are not designed for road use. This includes:

  • All permanent vehicles registered to, owned by or leased to you, including long-term hire vehicles
  • Temporary vehicles such as courtesy or short term hire vehicles
  • Other vehicles, irrespective of the duration, regularly covered under your fleet policy’

Please see the attached links to the MIB website –

Motor Trade – https://www.mib.org.uk/media/135974/motor-trade-and-the-mid.pdf

Motor Fleet – https://www.mib.org.uk/media/135977/fleets-and-the-mid.pdf

It is important that you also follow the advice of the insurer in relation to recording temporary vehicles – many insurers have MID information on their broker websites.

The legal obligation for a policyholder to supply all vehicle information to their insurer is contained in the ‘Motor Vehicles (Compulsory Insurance) (Information Centre and Compensation Body) Regulations 2003’. These state that should a policyholder elect not to update the MID with temporary vehicles held in their possession for less than 15 days, they do have a legal responsibility to create and retain records of such vehicles for a period of at least 7 years.

The information that needs to be recorded by a policyholder, as set down in the 2003 Regulations, is –

(a) the number of the policy under which the use of the vehicle is insured,

(b) the registration mark of the vehicle, and

(c) the period during which the use of the vehicles is (or has been) covered under the policy

The post Temporary Vehicles on Unspecified Motor Fleet and Motor Trade Policies and the Motor Insurance Database (MID) appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
29250
Grenfell Tower – Property and Liability Insurance Considerations https://www.biba.org.uk/technical-updates/grenfell-tower-property-liability-insurance-considerations/ Wed, 24 Jan 2018 11:33:54 +0000 https://www.biba.org.uk/?p=28921 Grenfell Tower – Property and Liability Insurance Considerations Following the terrible fire at Grenfell Tower on 14 June 2017, the Government has announced a Public

The post Grenfell Tower – Property and Liability Insurance Considerations appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
Grenfell Tower – Property and Liability Insurance Considerations

Following the terrible fire at Grenfell Tower on 14 June 2017, the Government has announced a Public Inquiry which is being led by Sir Martin Moore-Bick (for the terms of reference for the inquiry see https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/grenfell-tower-inquiry-terms-of-reference-published ).

Dame Judith Hackitt is chairing an Independent Review of Building Regulations and Fire Safety also set up following the Grenfell Tower tragedy.  The interim report, issued in December 2017, (see – https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/independent-review-of-building-regulations-and-fire-safety-interim-report ) found that:

  • a culture change is required, with the construction industry taking greater responsibility for what is built
  • the current system for ensuring fire safety in high-rise buildings is not fit for purpose
  • a clear, quick and effective route for residents to raise concerns and be listened to, must be created.

The Grenfell fire has reminded those responsible for fire detection/elimination/protection in high rise buildings that great care needs to be taken and appropriate safety checks conducted.

There are a number of insurance implications arising from the fire and BIBA’s Liability & Accident and Property Committees have debated and considered the following issues –

Property Insurance Issues

The Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) has requested that Local Authorities and Registered Social Landlords identify and record the number of properties above 18 metres high, including whether any panels used in new build or property refurbishment are a particular type of cladding made of aluminium composite materials (ACM). However, it has also been identified that ACM may also have been used in the construction of schools, NHS hospitals and universities and similar enquiries are being undertaken. It is also understood that ACM cladding may have been used in the construction of hotels, offices and other commercial and leisure sectors.

A number of issues have been raised following the fire, some of which may need to be considered when making a ‘Reasonable Search’ and ‘Fair Presentation of Risk’ of any property insurance as part of the new obligations under the Insurance Act.  These include

  • Adequacy of sums insured for Property policies. Not only the adequacy of the building sum insured, but also whether the cover for loss of rent and alternative accommodation is sufficient? The indemnity period will also need to be carefully considered.
  • The construction of the building (structural frame, external walls, internal walls, floors, roof) and the materials used not only in the original build but also materials attached to and forming part of the building (cladding etc).
  • What fire protections are in buildings? – fire alarms, sprinklers, service risers, fire doors etc. Is there a log/checklist of all fire safety equipment to identify condition and maintenance?
  • Refurbishment of properties – What additions/changes to the building have been made? E.g. extensions, new heating (do internal walls retain their integrity against fire spread?), what materials have been used in the course of refurbishment.
  • If cladding/insulation has been used what is the combustibility of the insulation material? There are five categories: Combustible, Fire Retardant, Approved Fire Retardant, Fire Resistant and Incombustible.  Any cladding/insulation will need to comply with the relevant Building Regulations and Standards applicable at the time of installation.
  • Fire risk assessments, protections and procedures. Fire risk assessments are required by the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 and virtually all those with control of non-domestic premises are required to ensure that a suitable and sufficient fire risk assessment is undertaken, and, in most cases, recorded.  This should be carried out by a responsible person who implements appropriate fire precautionary and protection measures along with maintaining a fire management plan.  The assessment may require review and change following any works undertaken.  Regular inspections by the building owners or agents are essential to maintain the integrity of physical and management standards.  Clear records should be maintained.

Liability Insurance

Legal liability has not yet been determined in the Grenfell Tower case. This is likely to take some considerable time due to:

  • the public inquiry
  • the number of potential claimants
  • potential cost – compensation to direct victims and substantial consequential losses, plus legal costs
  • the number of potential defendants (fridge manufacturer, resident of flat at source of fire, landlords, management company, local authority, developer, contractor, panel supplier)
  • HSE and Police investigations and potential prosecutions

Legal liability could arise in:

  • Negligence
  • Nuisance
  • Failure to warn
  • Breach of professional duty
  • Contract – breach of contract, contractual responsibility, collateral warranties, fitness for purpose, deleterious materials, pure economic loss etc.
  • Breach of statutory duty – health & safety regulations, building regulations
  • Criminal – HSE prosecutions, corporate manslaughter, gross negligence manslaughter

There may be many liability exposures that would need to be considered, including –

  • local authority/property owner/landlord
  • management company
  • architect design liability
  • main contractor and sub-contractor
  • cladding manufacturer/supplier
  • manufacturer of the domestic appliance that caught fire
  • who makes the decisions regarding works/refurbishments

The question of limits of indemnity under public liability, employers’ liability, professional indemnity and directors’ & officers’ policies will need to be considered, including –

  • Nature of the property and use
  • The potential for multiple injuries and deaths (especially in light of the recent change to the Discount Rate for personal injury compensation)
  • Consideration of significant property damage.
  • Consideration of other losses including: alternative accommodation; damage to adjacent property in the area; denial of access.

Please see BIBA’s PI Volume 6 ‘Managing under-insurance’ which discusses special considerations for liability limits – https://view.publitas.com/biba/professional-indemnity-volume-6-managing-under-insurance-a-guide-to-prevention/page/1

Other liability insurance considerations may include –

  • Products liability – are there efficacy exclusions in products liability policies of suppliers/installers of fire protection and suppression equipment?
  • Remedial costs in relation to the costs of replacing cladding on other buildings.
  • Has the relevant limitation period for remedial works expired?

Professional indemnity insurance for consultants and contractors involved in cladding work has come under the spotlight –

  • PI insurers’ renewal questionnaires are more detailed, sometimes seeking information on work involving cladding going back as far as 15 years.
  • Premiums and excesses are increasing for consultants and contractors involved in cladding. PI cover is being restricted in some cases to an aggregate limit of indemnity rather than each and every claim. We further understand that some insurers are applying prior work exclusions in relation to cladding work.
  • Block notifications is a delicate issue. There is case history to the effect that if a broker fails to raise the issue with a client when there is an arguable case to make such a notification then the broker could be liable (see Ocean Finance & Mortgages Ltd v Oval Insurance Broking Ltd).
  • As ever, it depends on the PI policy wording as to whether a notification of circumstance should be made to insurers. The claims conditions and definition of a claim should be reviewed.

The post Grenfell Tower – Property and Liability Insurance Considerations appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
28921
Blog – The Collapse of Carillion https://www.biba.org.uk/technical-updates/blog-collapse-carillion/ Wed, 24 Jan 2018 11:05:08 +0000 https://www.biba.org.uk/?p=28919 With the recent news of Carillion’s collapse, we thought we should reemphasise the importance of trade credit insurance and the new scheme provided by CMR

The post Blog – The Collapse of Carillion appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
With the recent news of Carillion’s collapse, we thought we should reemphasise the importance of trade credit insurance and the new scheme provided by CMR Insurance Services. The recent demise of Carillion demonstrates that no matter the size of a company, it can still fail and often with a much more catastrophic effect. CMR can provide your clients, through their specialised managed policy, a comprehensive protection against the risk of suffering a bad debt. For more information on the BIBA member scheme or to contact CMR please click here. Also, don’t miss their webinar on 14th February, where they will explain the importance of trade credit insurance and how it can help businesses grow.

This blog is brought to your by CMR Insurance Services

The Collapse of Carillion

The collapse of giant Carillion has shaken the construction world. The devastating aftermath continues as the numerous suppliers and employees struggle to come to terms with the fall out. We know that Carillion had been struggling for a long time: shares plummeted from over 200p to 14p in the past year, the result of money lost on large contracts which in turn ran up vast debts.

On 10 July 2017, Carillion issued a trading update that referred to a £845 million impairment charge in its construction services division. As a result, their share price dropped considerably. At the end of September, Carillion’s 6 month financial statement ending 30-June-2017 displayed losses of £1.15 billion. At the same time, Carillion’s debts grew to just under £1 billion. Facing such a disastrous financial struggle, the only way out would be a takeover. That unfortunately never materialised.

Many suppliers to the UK’s second largest construction company will be sweating as to whether they will be paid. Prudent businesses will be waiting on their credit insurer to pay claims to cover these losses they will ultimately suffer. Once again Carillion’s collapse points to the necessity of trade credit insurance and highlights why BIBA has chosen to team up with trade credit insurance specialist CMR Insurance Services as our new scheme provider.

Through CMR, members will be able to provide a product to clients that protects the risk of non-payment from their debtors. Secondly but significantly CMR will keep their clients up to date with the financial situation of their customers. These early warning signs can help guide businesses away from the ticking time bombs of less secure businesses to strong and stable customers, a welcomed reassurance in these uncertain times.

Credit insurers will be paying claims against the losses to those companies that have had the foresight to take out credit insurance policies against companies such as Carillion. Why not offer this new scheme to you current clients? They will be wary of bad debts as it is patently clear that any company, no matter the size, can fail.

For more information, get in touch with CMR and their experts to understand how a trade credit insurance policy could help your customers grow. Also, don’t miss their webinar on 14th February, where CMR will explain the importance of trade credit insurance and how it can help businesses grow.

The post Blog – The Collapse of Carillion appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
28919
REMINDER – Members offering Private Motor Insurance – CMA Return due on 1st February 2018 https://www.biba.org.uk/technical-updates/reminder-members-offering-private-motor-insurance-cma-return-due-1st-february-2018/ Mon, 22 Jan 2018 10:52:14 +0000 https://www.biba.org.uk/?p=28857 Annual Compliance Statement If you offer Private Motor insurance including optional NCD Protection, the Competition and Markets Authority Private Motor Insurance Order 2015 requires you

The post REMINDER – Members offering Private Motor Insurance – CMA Return due on 1st February 2018 appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
Annual Compliance Statement

If you offer Private Motor insurance including optional NCD Protection, the Competition and Markets Authority Private Motor Insurance Order 2015 requires you to submit on 1st February 2018:

  • Annual Compliance Statement – a statement confirming compliance with the Order (please see Schedule 3 on page 19 of the CMA Final order – here), and
  • Average NCB Discount[s] – details of average NCD scales being applied by your panel of motor insurance providers (please see Annex 1 on page 19 of the Order)

The average NCD scales you send must have been updated by insurers, to reflect average NCD percentages granted to their policyholders from 1st January 2017 to 31st December 2017.

This means that insurers only have the month of January 2018 to collect together all necessary data, recalculate average NCD percentages and provide them to software houses to integrate into the system. For this reason we recommend that you do not try to submit your compliance statement early, as the average NCD scales which need to accompany this are unlikely to be available until very close to the 1st February 2018.

You may find that some insurers will show their average NCB tables on their broker website.

The information is to be e-mailed to the CMA at their e-mail address – pmi.order@cma.gsi.gov.uk

The post REMINDER – Members offering Private Motor Insurance – CMA Return due on 1st February 2018 appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
28857
Recent Motor Insurance Case Law extending ‘Use of a Vehicle’ under the Road Traffic Act following the CJEU ‘Vnuk’ judgement https://www.biba.org.uk/technical-updates/recent-motor-insurance-case-law-extending-use-vehicle-road-traffic-act-following-cjeu-vnuk-judgement/ Tue, 17 Oct 2017 11:11:56 +0000 https://www.biba.org.uk/?p=28135 Use of a Vehicle – R&S Pilling (t/a Phoenix Engineering) v UK Insurance Ltd [2017] EWCA Civ 259 In this case the Court of Appeal

The post Recent Motor Insurance Case Law extending ‘Use of a Vehicle’ under the Road Traffic Act following the CJEU ‘Vnuk’ judgement appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
Use of a Vehicle – R&S Pilling (t/a Phoenix Engineering) v UK Insurance Ltd [2017] EWCA Civ 259

In this case the Court of Appeal held that repairs to a vehicle were considered to be use of a vehicle.

Mr Holden, employed by R&S Piling, was permitted to undertake repairs to his car in R&S Piling’s factory premises.  In the course of the repair his car caught light whilst he was welding it and the fire spread to his employer’s factory premises and adjoining premises.

AXA Insurance were Property and Public Liability insurer of R&S Piling and UK Insurance were Mr Holden’s motor insurer.  AXA brought a claim against UK Insurance arguing that the repairs were consistent with use of a vehicle.  The judge held that held that undergoing repairs was not part of the normal function of a vehicle, and that it was an “accident” as it was a fortuitous or unexpected event.  AXA were allowed to appeal.

The Court of Appeal  judgement was  that carrying out repairs by Holden to enable the car to be in a safe condition and pass its MOT so he could continue to drive it was consistent with the normal function of a car.

The Master of the Rolls held that such an interpretation was consistent with the EU Motor Insurance Directive’s aim in protecting victims of motor accidents, and also with the wording of the Directive, which used the word “use” rather than “operate” or “drive”.

Use of a Vehicle – Christopher Wastell v (1) Estate of Gordon John Woodward (Deceased) (2) Chaucer Syndicates Ltd [2017]

Woodward owned a hamburger van which was parked in a layby.  He had stepped out into the road whilst returning to his van after displaying a sign for his business on the opposite side of the road. Woodward was hit by a motorcycle and was killed instantly and Wastell, the motorcyclist, was badly injured.

Woodward had no public liability insurance, but his partner had a motor insurance policy insured with Chaucer Syndicates, on which he was a named driver. The policy, however, did not cover the use of the van as a business.

The issue for the court was whether the accident arose out of “the use of a vehicle” for the purpose of s. 145(3) of the Road Traffic Act [1988] which provides that compulsory motor insurance must insure the drivers named in the policy in respect of death or personal injury “caused by, or arising out of, the use of the vehicle on a road or other public place”. 

Chaucer Syndicates argued the motor vehicle was not being used as such and instead was being used as a stationary hamburger van with the purpose of selling burgers to passers-by. Furthermore the activity of placing and adjusting a business sign was a self-contained activity.

The Court had to determine ‘what was the use of the vehicle on the road’ and then ask ‘whether the accident arose out of that use’. The relevant use in this case was a hamburger van. Although Woodward and his partner did not disclose to Chaucer Syndicates that the van was to be used in this capacity, that was found to be irrelevant – the claim had to be dealt with according to the wording of the Road Traffic Act rather than the scope of the contract of insurance.

The accident arose out of the use of the van as a hamburger van which was parked up in order to sell hamburgers and Woodward was in the process of returning to his van after putting up a sign to further that activity. It was held that the accident was closely linked to using the van on the road and the issue was determined in favour of Wastell.

The post Recent Motor Insurance Case Law extending ‘Use of a Vehicle’ under the Road Traffic Act following the CJEU ‘Vnuk’ judgement appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
28135
See the results of our Brief Brexit Survey https://www.biba.org.uk/technical-updates/see-results-brief-brexit-survey/ Thu, 05 Oct 2017 15:03:09 +0000 https://www.biba.org.uk/?p=28070 2017-09-26-Survey-Monkey-Responses-Brexit

The post See the results of our Brief Brexit Survey appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
2017-09-26-Survey-Monkey-Responses-Brexit

The post See the results of our Brief Brexit Survey appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
28070
ABI Trade Credit Insurance Guide https://www.biba.org.uk/technical-updates/abi-trade-credit-insurance-guide/ Wed, 24 May 2017 14:56:52 +0000 https://www.biba.org.uk/?p=27277 The post ABI Trade Credit Insurance Guide appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
The post ABI Trade Credit Insurance Guide appeared first on British Insurance Brokers' Association.

]]>
27277